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Auto insurance companies return $800 million in premiums because no one is driving |Coronavirus Update

Auto insurance companies return $800 million in premiums because no one is driving |Coronavirus Update

Allstate, American Family Insurance Return $800 Million In Premiums As Coronavirus Has Fewer People Driving
Allstate, American Family Insurance to return $800 million in premiums because no one is driving

Two insurers — Allstate and American Family Insurance — announced Monday they will give back about $800 million to their auto insurance customers because people are driving far less during the coronavirus crisis.

Allstate to return $600 million in auto premiums as coronavirus cuts driving

Allstate Corp (ALL.N), one of the largest U.S. auto insurers, said on Monday it would return more than $600 million in premiums to customers as many Americans drive less due to stay-at-home orders aimed at curbing the coronavirus outbreak.

Most customers will receive a payback of 15% of their monthly premium in April and May, the company said.

The payback, which will apply to 18 million policies issued by Allstate and its Esurance and Encompass units, follows a data analysis by the insurer that showed mileage is down between 35% and 50% in most states, Allstate Chief Executive Officer Tom Wilson said during a call with reporters Monday.

The analysis, based on data that Allstate collects from tracking products that some customers agree to use in exchange for discounts, and other sources, showed no difference between states that had shelter orders in effect and those that did not, Wilson said.

Still, some people may be driving faster on what are now less densely traveled roads, which could lead to more serious accidents, Wilson said.

Allstate’s payments will go to all US and Canadian customers with personal auto insurance, whether or not their state has any kind of stay-at-home order.

American Family, which only serves customers in 19 states, also said its payments would go to all of its customers.

“American Family Insurance is doing this out of responsibility to our customers. They are driving less and experiencing fewer claims. Because of these results, they deserve premium relief,” said Telisa Yancy, American Family chief operating officer.

The premium relief will come in the form of a one-time full payment of $50 per vehicle covered by an American Family personal auto policy.

The typical American Family household with auto coverage has two vehicles, meaning the average relief check will be $100.

American Family expects to complete the printing and distribution of all 2.3 million checks within 60 days, while diligently applying social distancing practices.

The total of the partial premium refunds is expected to be $200 million.

“We are financially strong, and in a position to provide these payments to our customers at a time when it makes a meaningful difference,” ,said Telisha Yancy,American Family chief operating officer

Payments to customers in the company’s additional 18 operating states will follow after Wisconsin, pending approval from their insurance regulators.

American Family is also offering flexibility in several areas including payment deferral, payment plans, the removal of late fees, and suspending underwriting and nonrenewal cancellations.

American Family has also extended private passenger automobile coverage to food delivery drivers hired by restaurants.

CORONAVIRUS SURVIVOR DONATES HIS PLASMA TO  PATIENT IN CRITICAL NEED |Coronavirus

CORONAVIRUS SURVIVOR DONATES HIS PLASMA TO PATIENT IN CRITICAL NEED |Coronavirus

He recovered from the coronavirus and now his plasma donation could save the lives of others
He recovered from the coronavirus and now his plasma donation could save the lives of others

A California man who was diagnosed with the coronavirus and recovered has donated his plasma to help others fighting the potentially deadly virus.

An Orange County hospital has become the first on the West Coast to try an experimental treatment for COVID-19 as a patient in serious condition just received a plasma transfusion from a man who recently recovered.

On March 6, Jason Garcia noticed he had a mild cough and some congestion.

The 36-year-old aerospace engineer from Escondido, California, didn’t think that much of it. But later while on a work trip, he noticed a headache had begun accompanying his cough.

Within a day, he also had a fever and body aches that quickly came and went. Then he began experiencing shortness of breath

Garcia called his doctor and based on his symptoms was told to go to the hospital and get tested for coronavirus.

If it works, it could offer hope as the potentially deadly infection wreaks havoc worldwide.

Inside St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, a critically ill coronavirus patient waits to see if an trial treatment will help him recover.

“It”s really there for those patients that are severely affected or whose life is threatened by the virus,” said Wendy Escobedo, RN, the nursing director for Dialysis and Kidney Transplants.

Bronx Zoo tiger Nadia,tests positive for coronavirus | Coronavirus Updates

Bronx Zoo tiger Nadia,tests positive for coronavirus | Coronavirus Updates

Nadia, a tiger at the Bronx Zoo in New York, has become the first of her kind to test positive for the coronavirus.
Nadia, a tiger at the Bronx Zoo in New York, has become the first of her kind to test positive for the coronavirus.

A tiger at the Bronx Zoo in New York City has tested positive for the virus that causes COVID-19, and six other big cats are exhibiting symptoms consistent with the illness, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Sunday afternoon.

“Nadia, a 4-year-old female Malayan tiger at the Bronx Zoo, has tested positive for COVID-19. She, her sister Azul, two Amur tigers, and three African lions had developed a dry cough and all are expected to recover,” the statement read.
The diagnosis was confirmed by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Iowa “out of an abundance of caution,” the society said.

“It’s the first time, to our knowledge, that a [wild] animal has gotten sick from COVID-19 from a person,” says Paul Calle, chief veterinarian for the Bronx Zoo.

The Malayan tiger, named Nadia, likely contracted the coronavirus from an infected—but unknown—asymptomatic zookeeper. “It’s the only thing that makes sense,” Calle says. The zoo has been closed to visitors since March 16.

“Though they have experienced some decrease in appetite, the cats at the Bronx Zoo are otherwise doing well under veterinary care and are bright, alert, and interactive with their keepers,” the zoo said.

Anyone sick with the coronavirus is being advised to minimize contact with animals, including pets, until more information is known about the virus, the USDA said.

In the United States, there is no evidence to suggest that any animals, including pets, livestock, or wildlife, might be a source of COVID-19 infection at this time,” according to the CDC.

“However, because all animals can carry germs that can make people sick, it’s always a good idea to practice healthy habits around pets and other animals,” the agency notes.

Over 40 spring breakers from Texas who ignored public health advice test positive for COVID-19

Over 40 spring breakers from Texas who ignored public health advice test positive for COVID-19

At least 44 students, not pictured, from the University of Texas in Austin tested positive for coronavirus after they traveled to Mexico for spring break.
At least 44 students, not pictured, from the University of Texas in Austin tested positive for coronavirus after they traveled to Mexico for spring break.

The students from the University of Texas in Austin, who are all in their 20s, traveled in a group of about 70 on a chartered plane to Cabo San Lucas two weeks ago, with 44 since testing positive for coronavirus.

Upon their return, 28 students initially tested positive for Covid-19 and more were confirmed to have the virus on Wednesday, university officials said.

The students’ trip went directly against the advice of the White House, which asked people to avoid nonessential air travel and gathering in groups of more than 10, invoking the anger of Texas House Speaker Dennis Bonnen, who lashed out at group.

“Quit being an a**,” Texas House Speaker Dennis Bonnen told CNN affiliate KXAN. “Get over yourselves. Whether you think this is an issue or not, it is.

Whether you think it could affect you or not, it does. The reality of it is, if I’m a college kid who’s going to spring break in Mexico, you’re affecting a lot of people. Grow up.”

The Austin Public Health Department said that some of the students flew back on commercial flights, which they said directly endangered others traveling with them.

A New York nurse shared a chilling photo of coronavirus victims to show ‘the ghastly reality of what’ medical workers deal with on frontlines

A New York nurse shared a chilling photo of coronavirus victims to show ‘the ghastly reality of what’ medical workers deal with on frontlines

Newyork dead bodies
Inside a truck at an ambulance bay outside a New York City hospital, March 29

A nurse at a Manhattan hospital shared a chilling image of a makeshift morgue for coronavirus patients, in order to underscore how serious the pandemic really is.

The 38-year-old registered nurse at a Manhattan hospital was nearing the end of his shift Sunday morning when he stepped toward the building’s ambulance bay.

There, a giant refrigerator truck was sitting, ready to carry away those who had died from complications of COVID-19.

He walked up to the truck, opened the latch, and snapped a picture.

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“I took it to show to people,” the nurse told Buzzfeed. “It is the ghastly reality of what we deal with and where some of us have ended up already.”

According to text messages he sent to Buzzfeed, one of the bodies in the truck was a 71-year-old woman who he had watched take her last breath the night before.

She’d tested positive a week earlier and was sent home, returning to the hospital with shortness of breath. She asked not to be intubated and died.

“I never had the patience to sit with somebody I’d just met until they took their last breath. But I really liked this lady’s cardigan and pajamas so I decided to stay and get to know her a little,” he said over text message. “Her hair was elegantly done with a sharp, meticulous clip and casually pulled up with a bandana that matched her house clothes. Perhaps if she’d covered her face with it instead, she wouldn’t have ended up here in the first place. But she didn’t die alone.”

The image was shortly followed by disturbing footage from a different New York City borough showing a forklift loading what appear to be body bags into the back of a truck.

“This is live from Brooklyn, New York,” the cameraman said over the footage. “They’re putting bodies in the back of a freezer truck.”

Coronavirus cases top 300,000 in U.S

At least 8,100 people have died of coronavirus in the US while global death toll surged past 60,000.

Confirmed cases of coronavirus in the United States surpassed 300,000 on Saturday, with more than 8,000 deaths.

The updated total came as Anthony S. Fauci, the country’s top infectious disease expert, reiterated that the risk of a coronavirus resurgence is real.

New York state’s coronavirus death toll has risen at a devastating pace to reach 3,565, up from 2,935 the previous day, the largest 24-hour jump recorded there.

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