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coronavirus update

New Mass Graves Are Being Dug Because New York Morgues Are Overwhelmed During The Coronavirus | Coronavirus Outbreak

New Mass Graves Are Being Dug Because New York Morgues Are Overwhelmed During The Coronavirus | Coronavirus Outbreak

Unclaimed virus victims buried in mass grave in New York
Unclaimed virus victims buried in mass grave in New York

New York victims without family buried in mass grave on Hart Island

New York City has begun digging extra graves in its public cemetery, with pictures showing pine caskets stacked on top of each other in a large burial pit.

New York City officials say that Hart Island, which for decades has been used as the final resting place for people who died unclaimed, will also be used for unclaimed coronavirus victims.

Mayor Bill de Blasio responded Friday to concerns that mass burials would be necessary because of the high number of bodies caused by the pandemic.

Drone photos appeared to show groups of caskets being covered with dirt in long trenches on Hart Island.

About two dozen bodies are now being buried each day on an uninhabited island that serves as a potter’s field, up from about two dozen each week before the coronavirus hit the city.

Typically, some 25 bodies are interred each week by low-paid jail inmates working on the island, which sits off the east shore of the city’s Bronx borough and is accessible only by boat.

That number began increasing in March as the new coronavirus spread rapidly, making New York the epicenter of the global pandemic.

Officials in New York City have hired laborers to dig new trenches for mass graves in response to a surge in the number of deaths in the city.

Only people who have not been claimed by relatives or a loved will be buried there, Goldstein highlighted.

Despite the new rule from the medical examiner, Goldstein said as long as morgue officials make contact with a relative within 14 days, they will not be moved to Hart Island.

“These are people who, for two weeks, we have not been able to find anyone who says, ‘I know that person, I love that person, I will handle the burial,'” Goldstein said. “These are people who we have made zero contact with the family.”

People interred on the island are wrapped in body bags and put in pine caskets before being buried in long trenches, according to Reuters.

The caskets have the person’s name written on them beforehand to help identify each person if they need to be disinterred later.

Family members of people buried at Hart Island can make arrangements with the city to visit, but those visits have been suspended until further notice due to the crisis.

CORONAVIRUS SURVIVOR DONATES HIS PLASMA TO  PATIENT IN CRITICAL NEED |Coronavirus

CORONAVIRUS SURVIVOR DONATES HIS PLASMA TO PATIENT IN CRITICAL NEED |Coronavirus

He recovered from the coronavirus and now his plasma donation could save the lives of others
He recovered from the coronavirus and now his plasma donation could save the lives of others

A California man who was diagnosed with the coronavirus and recovered has donated his plasma to help others fighting the potentially deadly virus.

An Orange County hospital has become the first on the West Coast to try an experimental treatment for COVID-19 as a patient in serious condition just received a plasma transfusion from a man who recently recovered.

On March 6, Jason Garcia noticed he had a mild cough and some congestion.

The 36-year-old aerospace engineer from Escondido, California, didn’t think that much of it. But later while on a work trip, he noticed a headache had begun accompanying his cough.

Within a day, he also had a fever and body aches that quickly came and went. Then he began experiencing shortness of breath

Garcia called his doctor and based on his symptoms was told to go to the hospital and get tested for coronavirus.

If it works, it could offer hope as the potentially deadly infection wreaks havoc worldwide.

Inside St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, a critically ill coronavirus patient waits to see if an trial treatment will help him recover.

“It”s really there for those patients that are severely affected or whose life is threatened by the virus,” said Wendy Escobedo, RN, the nursing director for Dialysis and Kidney Transplants.

China reported the second day in a row of no new domestic cases of the virus.

China reported the second day in a row of no new domestic cases of the virus.

Mainland China reported 39 new cases of coronavirus — all imported from overseas — and three new deaths as of end of day Thursday, according to the country’s National Health Commission.

This brings the death toll in mainland China to 3,248 and total confirmed cases to 80,967.

Thursday is the second day China has reported no increase in domestically transmitted coronavirus cases.

It is also the second day no new confirmed cases were reported in Hubei province, the epicenter of the pandemic.

Concerns over a so-called “second wave” of infections have increased in recent days as the number of imported cases — linked to overseas travel — have risen throughout Asia.

China is among a number of countries where stringent measures appear to have brought the virus under control, but where concerns are now mounting of a fresh wave brought in by travellers.